Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory



Katie Lundquist

Simulation Toolkit

My research interests are broad within the areas of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and scientific computing. I am interested the application of CFD to both environmental and engineering problems. Specific interests include atmospheric and Earth system modeling, transport and dispersion, multi-scale multi-physics model development, turbulence, large-eddy simulation, immersed boundary methods, physics parameterizations, and aerodynamics.  lundquist3@llnl.gov or call
925-422-3910


Contact us at:  windpower@llnl.gov or call  925-422-7108

Jeffrey Mirocha

Atmospheric Science

Jeff Mirocha is an atmospheric scientist with interests in boundary-layer meteorology, turbulence, and multiscale atmospheric simulation. Over 14 years at LLNL, he has led and contributed to numerous projects involving geophysical, atmospheric dispersion, and renewable energy applications. He currently supports several wind energy projects, including mesoscale-to-microscale coupling, offshore wind resource sciences, and high-fidelity energy resource modeling, while also researching wildfire dynamics and emissions.  mirocha2@llnl.gov or call  925-422-4627


Sonia Wharton

Field Observations

I am a micrometeorologist with interests in wind energy and land surface-atmosphere flux exchange. My experience in wind energy research ranges from deploying lidar and in situ instrumentation to evaluating turbine power performance response. Currently I work on DOE funded projects in wind resource characterization. These include measurement studies to better understand flow over complex terrain, flow within wind farms, and plant-scale plant response to atmospheric conditions. I am also the PI of the Diablo Grassland AmeriFlux tower at Site 300 (Altamont, California) and co-PI of the Wind River Old-Growth Forest AmeriFlux tower in Washington State. At these sites we are measuring net carbon, water and energy exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere. These measurements quantify whether these systems are a net carbon sink or source to the atmosphere.  wharton4@llnl.gov or call  925-422-9295